Extreme Abuse Survey Research

The Extreme Abuse Survey final results are online with findings, questionnaires and presentations for download as pdf-files. More than 750 pages of documentation http://extreme-abuse-survey.net/

Understanding ritual trauma: A comparison of findings from three online surveys – Handout  for Karriker, Wanda. (2008, November). Understanding ritual trauma: A comparison of findings from three online surveys. Paper presented at the meeting of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, Chicago, IL.

10 Extreme Abuse Survey Findings Helpful to Understanding Ritual Trauma

1. Ritual abuse/mind control (RA/MC) is a global phenomenon.

2. A diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder is common for persons who report histories of RA/MC. (84% of EAS respondents who answered that they have been diagnosed with DID [N=655] reported that they are survivors of RA/MC).

3. Ritual abuse (RA) is not limited to SRA, i.e., satanic ritual abuse, sadistic abuse, satanist abuse.

4. RA is reported to involve mind control techniques.

5. Some extreme abuse survivors report that they were used in government-sponsored mind control experimentation (GMC).

6. RA/MC is reported to be involved in organized “known” crime.

7. RA/MC is reported to be involved in clergy abuse.

8. Most often reported memories of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

9. Most often reported possible aftereffects of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

10. In rating the effectiveness of healing methods, therapists tend to favor stabilization techniques; survivors are more open to alternative ways to cope with indoctrinated belief systems.

http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/eas-studies/understanding-ritual-trauma-a-comparison-of-findings-from-three-online-surveys

HAND-OUT for Karriker, Wanda. (2008, April). Child Sexual Abuse and Beyond: Findings From a Series of International Extreme Abuse Surveys. Paper presented at the Fourteenth Annual Northern California Child Sexual Abuse Awareness Conference: Sacramento, CA. Karriker, Wanda. (2008, April).
Selected Responses from the EAS
My memories of abuse include incest. 1122 70%
I had memories of incest before I sought therapy/counseling. 985 64%
I was ritually abused in a satanic cult.* 986 55%
I had memories of ritual abuse before I sought therapy/counseling. 977 48%
Secret government-sponsored mind control experiments were
performed on me as a child. 1000 26%

I have been diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder (DID or MPD). 1007 65%
I am a therapist/counselor/clergy for RA/MC survivors. 965 10%

*Of the 257 EAS respondents who reported that secret mind control experiments were used on them as children, 69% (177) reported having been abused in a satanic cult. Of the 543 respondents who reported that they had been abused in a satanic cult, 33% (179) reported having been used in secret mind control experiments as children.

MEDIA PACKET – Torture-based, Government-sponsored Mind Control Experimentation on Children - Documentation that torture-based, government-sponsored mind control (GMC) experimentation was conducted on children during the Cold War. Data from two international surveys that give voice, visibility, and validation to survivors of these crimes against humanity….SURVEYS – EAS: Extreme Abuse Survey for Adult Survivors (An International Online Survey for Adult Survivors of Extreme Abuse) January 1 – March 30, 2007 with 1471 respondents from 31 named countries. P-EAS: Professional – Extreme Abuse Survey (An International Online Survey for Therapists, Counselors, Clergy, and Other Persons Who Have Worked Professionally with at Least One Adult Survivor of Extreme Abuse) April 1 – June 30 2007 with 451 respondents from 20 named countries. Contact: Wanda Karriker, PhD sandime@twave.net http://my.dmci.net/~casey/GovernmentSponsoredMindControlExperiments-MediaPacket.pdf

Rutz, C. Becker, T., Overkamp, B. & Karriker, W. (2008). Exploring Commonalities Reported by Adult Survivors of Extreme Abuse: Preliminary Empirical Findings. In Ritual Abuse in the Twenty-first Century: Psychological, Forensic, Social and Political Considerations, J.R. Noblitt & P. S. Perskin (Eds), pp. 31- 84. Brandon, Oregon: Robert D. Reed Publishers.

Becker, T., Karriker, W., Overkamp, B. Rutz, C. (2008). The Extreme Abuse Survey: preliminary findings regarding dissociative identity disorder. In A. Sachs & G. Galton (Eds.), Forensic Aspects of Dissociative Identity Disorder, pp. 32-49. London: Karnac.

Karriker, Wanda (November, 2007). “Helpful healing methods: As rated by approximately 900 respondents to the “International Survey for Adult Survivors of Extreme Abuse (EAS).” http://endritualabuse.org/about/eas-data-on-survivors-of-ritual-abuse-mind-control-and-healing-methods

Karriker, W. (2008, September). Torture-based mind control as a global phenomenon: Preliminary data from the 2007 series of Extreme Abuse Surveys. In Torture-based mind control: Empirical research, programmer methods, effects and treatment. Workshop conducted at the 13th International Conference on Violence, Abuse and Trauma, San Diego, CA.  http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/eas-studies/torture-based-mind-control-as-a-global-phenomenon/

http://eassurvey.wordpress.com/extreme-abuse-survey-final-results/

From :Rutz, C., Becker, T., Overkamp, B., & Karriker, W. (2008).

Exploring commonalities reported by adult survivors of extreme abuse: Preliminary empirical findings.
In R. Noblitt & P. Noblitt (Eds.), Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century (pp. 49-50).
Bandon, OR: Robert D. Reed.

Of 987 persons who self-selected the category of abuse that best describes their experiences, 19% chose ritual abuse; 7%, mind control; 52%, ritual abuse and mind control; 22%, other extreme abuse. Listed below are the five most frequently reported “yes” responses for the memories, possible aftereffects, and personal experiences sections.

Memories

· Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators

· Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators

· Other abuse(s)

· Being threatened with death if I ever talked about the abuse

· Witnessing physical abuse by perpetrators on other victims

Possible Aftereffects

· Sleep problems

· Painful body memories

· Posttraumatic stress disorder

· Unusual fears

· Beliefs indoctrinated by perpetrator(s)

Personal Experiences

· I have a spiritual belief system.

· I was subjected to RA/MC at ages 3 through 6.

· I was subjected to RA/MC at ages 7 through 13.

· I have been diagnosed with DID (dissociative identity disorder/ formerly multiple personality disorder).

· I had memories of incest before I sought therapy/counseling.

The five most frequently reported healing methods that were checked either “much help” or “great help” are

· Individual Psychotherapy/Counseling

· Supportive Friends

· Creative Writing

· Personal Prayer/Meditation

· Journaling

Relevant to the controversies over the reality of ritual abuse, government-sponsored mind control experimentation, the credibility of repressed memories, and claims that therapists implant false abuse memories in their clients, our data show that 64% of 985 respondents reported memories of incest and 48% of 977 respondents reported memories of ritual abuse before they sought therapy. Sixty-nine percent of 257 respondents who reported secret mind control experiments used on them as children also reported having been abused in a satanic cult.

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From:

Becker, T., Karriker, W., Overkamp, B., & Rutz, C. (2008).

The Extreme Abuse Surveys: Preliminary findings regarding dissociative identity disorder.

In A. Sachs & G. Galton (Eds.),

Forensic aspects of dissociative identity disorder (p. 41).

London:Karnac

If perpetrated in ritualistic settings, a sample of ten identical items from both the EAS (Extreme Abuse Survey for Adult Survivors) and P-EAS (for professionals) and ten similar items from the C-EAS (for child caregivers) could be classified as ideologically motivated crimes.

Listed below are the total number who answered the question (N) and the percent of “yes” responses to each statement by each group. (EAS – survivor reported the memory; P-EAS – professional had worked with at least one survivor who reported the memory; C-EAS – caregiver had heard at least one child report the memory)

EAS P-EAS C-EAS N % N % N %

1093 88% 216 97% 90 82% Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators.

1090 82% 217 95% 91 77% Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators.

1077 73% 221 88% 88 70% Forced drugging.

1057 56% 218  77% 96 43% Witnessing murder by perpetrators.

1059 55% 218 78% 92 59% Forced to participate in animal mutilations/killings.

1059 55% 220 82% 83 53% Pornography (child).

1040 48% 220  70% 90 42% Forced participation in murder by perpetrators.

1045 48% 218 77% 79 25% Prostitution (child).

1041 40% 220 71% 82 33% Forced impregnation.

1021    26% 217 55% 82 18% Survivor’s own child murdered by his/her perpetrators.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

From: Becker, T. (2008).Re-searching for new perspectives: Ritual abuse/ritual violence as ideologically motivated crime.In R. Noblitt & P. Noblitt (Eds.),Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century (pp. 245-246).

Bandon, OR: Robert D. Reed.

Although controversies over the existence of ritual abuse have centered on reports of abuse from satanic cults, results of two studies show that ritual abuse is also practiced in other groups founded on religious or ideological doctrines. In 1997, German journalist Ulla Froeling and German psychotherapist Michaela Huber (Becker, 1999) compiled data from a questionnaire returned by 126 therapists and counselors from 61 locations in Germany. The backgrounds of 354 cases in treatment were examined to determine the classification of groups in which survivors had been ritually abused. More than half of the victims reported abuse in more than one category. My co-researchers and I asked similar questions on the Extreme Abuse Survey for Adults (EAS) offered in German and English  See Table 1 for a comparison of preliminary results of both studies.

Table 1.

Comparisons of German-language and English-language Reports of Ritually Abusive Groups

(Percent of total respondents for each question who answered “Yes”)

______________________________________________________________________________

Groups SRA1 Gnostic2 Child Religious Fascist Uncertain     porn sects3 groups4 ideology

______________________________________________________________________________

Germany (1999) 58% (354) 52% (354)    26% (354) 12% (354) 03% (354)

EAS (German)5 29% (151)        07% (149)    40% (151)    29% (156)     15% (156) 35% (160)

EAS (English)6 60% (835)         15% (826)    50% (826)    41% (837) 23% (832) 50% (834)

EAS (Total) 55% (986) 14% (969)    48% (977) 39% (993)      22% (998)   47% (994)

______________________________________________________________________________

1,2 Category for German study is “Destructive Cults.” Most cases are from a satanic background but there are some from Gnostic-occult groups.

3 So-called Christian groups who are abusive through exorcism and cleaning rituals.

4 Described as a group that considers itself superior in race, creed, or origin, e.g., Neo-Nazi, White Supremacist and KKK.

5,6 From unpublished raw data

______________________

Three additional questions on the EAS asked about abuse in ideologically motivated groups: (1) Ritual abuse in a witchcraft cult was reported by 23% of 971 respondents, (2) ritual abuse in voodooism was reported by 7% of 966 respondents, and (3) 26% of 1000 respondents answered “yes” to the question: “Secret government-sponsored mind control experiments were performed on me as a child.”

From :Rutz, C., Becker, T., Overkamp, B., & Karriker, W. (2008). Exploring commonalities reported by adult survivors of extreme abuse: Preliminary empirical findings. In R. Noblitt & P. Noblitt (Eds.), Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century (p. 43). Bandon, OR: Robert D. Reed.

Webmaster’s note: These attacks occurred during the first EAS survey

Attacks

On the evening of January 2, 2007, the server faced an intense amount of port scans at the high and low ports and also attempts to access non-existing server pages by checking a variety of filenames. For a few days afterwards, the nameserver was addressed with several requests (ping, nslockup and trace) carried out on a large scale. This used an enormous amount of bandwidth, rendering the server at stake due to this loss.  In the first weeks, our provider’s own web projects had an unusually high amount of traffic suggesting that unknown people wanted to learn more about those working on the survey.

Fortunately, the attacks gradually diminished and after three weeks almost ended. In early March, there was another attempt to hack the server by someone trying to connect to the Microsoft Frontpage serverports which are part of the Microsoft Internet Information Server. Since we did not use these ports, this attack failed. Parallel to these incidents, third parties made several attempts to obtain the private data of some surveyors and technicians.